Pack The Court Tuesday In NYC: Oral Argument Stop & Frisk

Pack the court on Tuesday, October 29, at 11 a.m. for oral argument in Floyd, et al. v. City of New York

Oral argument will be held in the successful challenge brought by the Center for Constitutional Rights, along with co-counsel Beldock, Levine & Hoffman, LLP and Covington & Burling, LLP, to the New York City Police Department (NYPD) stop and frisk practices.

Floyd was brought on behalf of the millions of New Yorkers illegally stopped and frisked by the NYPD over the past eight years and was the first – and largest – federal class action lawsuit challenging the NYPD’s stop and frisk practices. In August, District Court Judge Shira A. Scheindlin ordered a sweeping reform process after she found that the NYPD has engaged in a widespread practice of unconstitutional and racially discriminatory stops and frisks. Later that month, the Mayor and the City appealed her decision and filed a motion to stay the reform process, which Judge Scheindlin rejected. Now the Mayor and the City have filed a motion for a stay in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

Earlier this month, community groups, labor organizations, and other allies flooded the steps of City Hall and submitted declarations to the Court of Appeals, explaining why this remedial process needs to move forward.

On October 29th, Plaintiffs’ attorneys will argue against the City’s motion for a stay and demonstrate why the reform process should go forward now rather than waiting months (or longer) for resolution of the City’s appeal of the case.

What: Oral arguments opposing a stay in Floyd v. the City of New York
When: Tuesday, October 29 from 11 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
(We suggest arriving at least 30-45 minutes early to clear security and obtain a seat in the courtroom.)
Where: Second Circuit Court of Appeals, 40 Foley Sq., Courtroom 1705

Please check the CCR event page here for updates.

See you Tuesday, October 29th to pack the court!  

Vincent Warren, Executive Director, Center for Constitutional Rights