Along with direct action and other forms of resistance, a successful movement must also build new institutions based on solidarity, justice and cooperation. From small, worker-owned cooperatives to national advocacy groups, hundreds of thousands of people around the country are working to create democratic and sustainable systems that meet the basic needs of all people. Below are some organizations, tools and other resources to help you get involved creating a new world.

Featured Video:The video to the right is the trailer for the new film, Fixing the Future, highlighting effective, local practices such as community banking, worker cooperatives, local currencies and more.

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Fighting For An Alternative To Big Banks

Members of the Campaign for Postal Banking delivered more than 150,000 signatures on a petition to the U.S. Postal Service headquarters in December 2015. - See more at: http://inequality.org/fighting-alternative-big-banks/#sthash.zU74yZX2.dpuf

By Katherine Isaac for Inequality – We’ve heard a lot about Wall Street reform in this presidential primary season. Most of the attention has been on the need to break up the “too big to fail” banks, curbing short-term speculation, and reining in executive bonuses. But we also need to create a financial system that serves the everyday need for accessible, affordable financial services. Nearly 28 percent of U.S. households are at least partially outside the financial mainstream, or underserved by traditional banks. A shocking 54 percent of African-American and 47 percent of Latino households are underserved.

Appeal From U.S. To World: Help Us Resist U.S. Crimes

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By Staff of Roots Action – Since the end of the Cold War, the United States of America has systematically violated the prohibition against the threat or use of force contained in the UN Charter and the Kellogg Briand Pact. It has carved out a regime of impunity for its crimes based on its UN Security Council veto, non-recognition of international courts and sophisticated “information warfare” that undermines the rule of law with political justifications for otherwise illegal threats and uses of force.

How To Socialize America’s Energy

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By Kate Aronoff for the LEAP Blog. Today’s renewable energy sector, while growing rapidly, hardly offers a roadmap to the transition needed. As billionaires battle over the profits promised by the “clean energy revolution,” experts agree that cobbling together private-sector solutions will not be enough. Neither will the boutique solutions on offer from the left. A more radical approach—one commensurate to the scale of the problem—will require state intervention. Yet traditional forms of public investment remain elusive. Calls for a Green New Deal or wartime-level mobilization against climate change, to use the oft-invoked metaphors (A “Marshall Plan for the Earth,” in Naomi Klein’s version), each take their cues from an economic ideology antithetical to today’s. Instead of direct investment, funding for renewables comes largely via tax credits and market-based incentives for private companies, including the recently extended 30 percent Investment Tax Credit (ITC) for solar. Public infrastructure spending and job creation programs remain off the table.

Why The Leap Manifesto Is Common Sense

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By Joanna Kerr for Green Peace. The response from politicians and commentators to the Leap Manifesto, a policy proposal to government from Canadian civil society, has been surprising. Much of the proposals contained in the manifesto flow from an acceptance of things we know to be true: that climate change is real and threatens our society and economy, that some groups of Canadians are more disadvantaged than others, and that dirty energy affects Indigenous communities on the frontlines of industrial sites foremost, to name a few. Far from being an elite and far-fetched radical proposal, the Leap Manifesto, with its roots in the country’s diverse civil society and the latest scientific research, reveals the zeitgeist of how Canadians want to live and do business with one another.

School Board Bans Climate Change-Denying Materials

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By Shasta Kearns Moore for the Portland Tribune. Portland, OR – In a move spearheaded by environmentalists, the Portland Public Schools board unanimously approved a resolution aimed at eliminating doubt of climate change and its causes in schools. “It is unacceptable that we have textbooks in our schools that spread doubt about the human causes and urgency of the crisis,” said Lincoln High School student Gaby Lemieux in board testimony. “Climate education is not a niche or a specialization, it is the minimum requirement for my generation to be successful in our changing world.” The resolution passed Tuesday evening calls for the school district to get rid of textbooks or other materials that cast doubt on whether climate change is occurring and that the activity of human beings is responsible.

Congress Approves Medical Marijuana For Veterans

Medical marijuana is shown in a jar at The Joint Cooperative in Seattle

By Aaron Rupar for Nation of Change. Congress approved measures prohibiting the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) from enforcing a policy prohibiting government doctors from prescribing medical marijuana to veterans. That essentially means doctors will now be able to recommend medical marijuana to veterans in the 24 states (plus D.C.) where it’s legal. Tom Angell, a longtime marijuana reform activist and chairman of Marijuana Majority, said the measure is important because it will allow some veterans to avoid taking opiates. “It’s looking like this could finally be the year the federal government stops making veterans jump through costly, time-consuming hoops just to get legal access to medical marijuana,” Angell said in a statement sent to ThinkProgress. “Cannabis has shown great promise in helping veterans deal with PTSD and treat chronic pain, and it’s an increasingly attractive alternative to opioids.”

How To Provide Medicare For All

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By Marcia Angell for The Boston Globe – Obamacare, aka the Affordable Care Act, became law six years ago. The intention was to ensure that nearly all Americans have health insurance, while controlling costs. How did that work out? When the law was enacted, about 16 percent of Americans were uninsured. That has dropped to 10 percent. So instead of 50 million uninsured Americans, there are now about 30 million without insurance. That’s better, but hardly universal.

Oregon County Rejects Nestle Water-Grab

Oxbow Springs water would have be bottled under Nestle's Arrowhead brand. (Photo: Nathan Rupert/flickr/cc)

By Andrea Germanos for Common Dreams – Voters in one Oregon county on Tuesday approved a ban on commercial bottled water production, stopping a years-long effort by Swiss transnational Nestle to sell over 100 million gallons of water a year from the Columbia River Gorge. “This is really a resounding victory for everyone who cares about protecting not only our water supply, but water supplies around the world,” said Aurora del Val with Local Water Alliance, which filed the ballot measure petition.

Oakland Green Lights Drug War Reparations, Passes Marijuana Equity Program

War on Drugs is a war on us

By David Downs for East Bay Express – Oaklanders who’ve been jailed for pot in the last ten years will go to the front of the line for legal weed permits under a revolutionary new program enacted by the City Council Tuesday night. The first-in-the-nation idea promises to make international headlines, and redefine the terms of reparations in post-Drug War America. Council voted unanimously to pass the historic “Equity Permit Program,” which bucks national trends in legal pot policy. Normally, convicted drug felons are barred from entering the legal cannabis trade. Instead, Oakland will reward them.

Regenerative Economy Can Help Save Environment

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By Iliana Salazar-Dodge for AlterNet – I am a Mexican immigrant and a senior at Columbia University who’s been organizing around fossil fuel divestment since freshman year. Two years ago, I had a bit of a crisis. I suddenly felt disillusioned with the movement—not with the tactic of divestment, but rather with the fact that national campaigns were solely focused on taking down the fossil fuel behemoth. Don’t get me wrong; it’s extremely satisfying to hear of another divestment win, to see the fossil fuel industry take a hit.

Energy Prize Winners Tackle The Future Of Power

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By David J. Unger for Inside Climate News – Up to now, these highly localized versions of power plants, which serve mainly hospitals, military bases and colleges, have been more micro than grid because they don’t work well with each other. A Massachusetts Institute of Technology Ph.D. student and four colleagues were creating one at Stone Edge Farm in Sonoma, Calif., last year when they stumbled on a way to make them communicate more effectively.

After Century In Decline, Black Farmers Are Back And On The Rise

Above Photo: Lindsey Lunsford gathers peppers at TULIP’s community garden. Photo by Wil Sands.

By Leah Penniman for Yes! Magazine – A few years ago, while clearing dried broccoli stalks from the tired soil of our land at Soul Fire Farm in upstate New York, I received a cold call from Boston. On the other end was a Black woman, unknown to me, who wanted to share her story of trying to make it as a farmer. Through tears, she explained the discrimination and obstacles she faced in a training program she’d joined, as well as in gaining access to land and credit.

Can US Learn From Denmark’s Ending Addiction To Carbon Energy?

Wind turbines rotate at a wind farm near the village of Rugsted in Denmark, where turbines today provide 42 percent of the country's electricity supply. Credit: JONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AFP/Getty Images

By Phil Mckenna for Inside Climate News – In the 1970s, Denmark was addicted to oil, burning petroleum not only to power its cars but also to generate electricity. Forty years later, the country is rapidly gaining on a mid-century goal of being fossil fuel-free, thanks partly to a policy that gives Danish citizens the legal right to own a stake in wind farms. More than 40 percent of the country is now powered by wind, up from less than a quarter a few years ago, and compared to only 5 percent in the United States.

Sue Your Bank! Better To Go To Court Than To Arbitrate

The small print covering your bank account, credit card and most other financial institution agreements requires you to submit to binding arbitration to resolve any disputes with your bank. Photograph: Alamy Stock Photo

By Suzanne McGee for The Guardian – New rules aim to return a consumer’s right to sue financial institutions – and the banks and credit card companies aren’t happy about it. If your bank hits you with what you consider to be unfair overdraft fees, or fails to notify you in a timely manner of new, higher fees – thus making it impossible for you to avoid them – you may end up losing enough money for it to be painful. But getting it back may be even more costly, too costly to make it worthwhile.

Disrupting Solar

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By Peter Diamandis for The Huffington Post – In the next 20 years, between 50 percent to 100 percent of the world’s energy production could come from solar. Today, the global oil and natural gas industry is about a $4 trillion business. It’s big money, and in the U.S., 67 percent of the electricity generated in 2015 was from fossil fuels (coal, natural gas, and petroleum). This is about to change.